Assessing Where We Are

April 28, 2015 § Leave a comment

Saint Anne

The first stage of planning for next year is taking an honest assessment of where we are and what is working and what could work better. This is one of those times where having a big family means a lot more work. This is a bit of a time consuming process. You really can’t skip this step even if you are moving from a school environment to homeschool. You just really need to know where you are in order to get to where you want to be.

The first things we are going to decide is if homeshooling is the best option for this child for the upcoming year or should we investigate other options, is the program and/or methodology we have been using working for us as a family and for this child in particular and which subjects are we continuing and which are we not. Once we say “yes, we are homeschooling next year.” I list out the subjects that each child has been working on this year and their extra curricular activities. For example Joshua has been working on Handwriting, Math, Spelling, Reading, History, Science, Grammar and Writing. We do CCD at our parish and Boy Scouts.

These go into my Yearly Assessment Worksheet. Then working across I ask the child their thoughts on the subject, I put down my assessment and if this is a subject that we will continue next year and if so will we use the same text series and what level we will need.

Yearly Assessment Worksheet.

This is also a great time to do a parent interview. We do this from time to time through the year but the end of the year is the “big one”. I sit down with each child and we go through a bunch of questions. The kids know they are free to say anything. This is a time where they can say anything at all and there will be no repercussions of any kind. It is very valuable to be able to see what they are feeling and thinking.

These are the questions we are using. If they don’t have an answer I let them think about it overnight and ask them again. I ask the questions and let them answer and then I hand the questions to them if they want/need to have some thinking time. It is ok to not have an answer.  Once I get the information I have a conference with each child and we talk about things they could do to make the family better.  I never share the specifics of what any child says to another, but we do talk about any themes that are revealed.

Interview questions

Homeschooling – Planning for next year – Reading Lists

June 12, 2009 § 1 Comment

Yesterday I listed out the texts that we are using for next year with the promise that I would return to our book lists in a future post.   Today’s post is all about why we use “real” books, how we incorporate them into our educational plans and which books we use.

Vincent Foppa - The Young Cicero Reading

Vincent Foppa - The Young Cicero Reading

Literature:

When I was a child in school I remember  reading from text books that excerpt short passages from “real” books or contained banal stories written with particular language lessons as the single driving force behind them – I loved to read; I hated reading as a subject.   As I started looking into homeschooling I found that this “twaddle” reading was objected to by more than my childhood self.  In fact several schools of educational thought out and out reject that approach outright.  So,  since it fits with my general inclination and is support by others in the field of education:  we go for real books.   Stories and books that are valued for their literary quality, cultural value, beauty and meaning, and their place in space and time are selected instead of stories that are selected or created for their mechanical purpose and functionality.

Exposing children to good literature develops their mind and imagination.  It creates a frame work for them to incorporate big ideas, important values, virtue, liberality of thought and curiosity.   Learning classic children’s tales also imparts the cultural literacy that will enrich their understanding of literature throughout their lives.

The real problem for us isn’t finding enough good books it is limiting the number to a manageable amount.  One  of my favorite lists can be found here. For each child we select books that fit their interests and their reading level.  For independent readers I assign a set amount of reading per day (one chapter usually) the child is supposed to note any words that they are unfamiliar with.  When they have completed the reading assignment they look up 3-5 of the words in the dictionary and type the definition into their reading log.  They also compose a short synopsis of the day’s reading.

For the first term Christopher will be reading  Tom Sawyer and The Hobbit for his literature study.   Hannah will have The Courage of Sarah Noble,  The Boxcar Children and A Bear Called Paddington.

We also have reading time.  The children are free to select any book off the following lists to read for 30 minutes a day.

Christopher’s Book list:
Call of the Wild
Black Beauty
The Red Badge of Courage
Swiss Family Robinson
Last of the Mohicans
Story of King Arthur
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
Robinson Crusoe
Kidnapped
Robin Hood
Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
or any classic he can talk me into.

Hannah is transitioning to independent reading so she can pretty much pull anything off the bookshelf that suits her fancy.  I will develop a list for her for the second term.  Josh and Sarah are still in the picture book stage.

We have read aloud time which is more directed to the younger children.  This year we will start with Hedi, Peter Pan and the House at Pooh Corner.  Once a week we will have a fairy tale story.

Shakespeare:

This is the first year for Christopher to be studying Shakespeare.   I started thinking about this last summer when Ashley took a liking to  Baz Luhrmann’s ‘Romeo + Juliet’.   It was one of those moments where my mind slipped around juggling uptight catholic mom, literature loving me and introduce the children to great books teacher roles.  The younger kids liked it to, but it is violent and sensual, but nothing really explicit, but it was very trendy looking and all that suicide and people dieing and sex… but how do I really get “Stop watching Shakespeare” out of my mouth without laughing myself silly.  So I let them watch it.  Which turned out fine.  They liked it, they got the basic story without being scandalised and and it stuck, they can reference it in a meaningful way.  So, Shakespeare it is.

I am going to start with Much Ado About Nothing.  First off it is one of my very favorites, it is included in Edith Nesbit’s highly recommended work and I really enjoy Kenneth Branagh’s version on DVD, which I happen to already have, which I think is sort of an elemental point.  Shakespeare is meant to be seen.  Plays studied only by sitting in front of a book lose their form and much of their vitality.  Which is why I would much rather have the children read a good story rendition based on the play, watch it using the language as written (which both Branagh and Luhrmann keep reasonably close to) and memorise some of the key passages.  My hope is that this will be rich and entertaining for the children this year.

Poetry:

This year we will also be doing several poetry until studies.  The poems we select will come from several different anthologies including:  A Children’s Garden, my old Oxford Anthology of English Literature and Where the Sidewalk Ends,  and A Child’s Anthology of Poetry.

Science:

Having looked in vain for a science text that I really liked I have decided to do something a little bit different.  I purchased an older science text (from the 1980s oh-so-old) and I am using it’s table of context as more or less a “spine” for Physical Science.  Along with this we will be studying biographies of  important scientist.  The first 12 weeks we will read about Aristotle, Galileo and Copernicus.   I am still researching the specific biographies for this.

I wouldn’t take this direction if I wasn’t flat out obstinate about what I think is important in a science curriculum and arrogant enough to think that my college level course work in Chemistry and Physics is adequate to answer the questions of a 10 year old boy doing middle school science.   But there it is.

Nature Study:

Learning about nature requires something more than just reading a text.  I love nature journals.  this fall the children will be working on cataloging the trees that grow around us.  Identifying native species and common foreign species and learning through observation, cataloging and study.  We are going to use a good field guide to native plants for most of this work.

Art and Music History:

This term we will not be doing any biographies in either art or music, but starting second term we will study one artist and one composer.

Homeschooling – Planning for next year – Books

June 11, 2009 § 2 Comments

Yesterday I blogged about the beginning of our homeschool plans for next year.   Today I am going into more detail starting with the books and texts we are selecting.

Ludovico Marchetti - A Good Book

Ludovico Marchetti - A Good Book

First off, we decided against using an out of the box curriculum a couple of years ago.  We had looked at a few of them, but we were having problems finding something that we really liked enough to devote ourselves to.  And basically it boiled down to a few issues.  I wanted faith to be a more or less integral part of the whole, but not a contrived part of it.   We also had to find things that fit with the ages and interests of our children. Homeschooling is a way of life; it is not just another option.  If you decide to homeschool it ends up affecting everything,  in mostly very good ways, but everything is changed or at least colored by that choice to homeschool.  When you select a curriculum that becomes part of your everyday life – every day.  So we end up picking and choosing what we use from several different programs including  Mater Amabilis (the biggest part),  Ambleside CHC, classical homeschooling and a big sampling of the wonderful things from the Real Learning forums.

After deciding the subjects we plan to study the next step is picking the texts, programs, etc.  that we wish to use.

Religion: For religion we use the Faith and Life Series from Ignatius press.  Our CCD classes use these books.  Next year we will use Book 1 , Book 3 and Book 5 we also have a copy of the  Saint Joseph Baltimore Catechism and The Loyola Treasury of Saints and New American Bible

Math: Our math text of choice has been Singapore Math.  We are considering switching Hannah to Saxon math, but if we do so it will be after the first 12 week term.  For Term one we will have:  Earlybird Kindergarten Math Textbook A and B , Singapore math 1B and 2A,  Singapore math 2A and 2B, and Singapore math 6A and 6B

English: We are using new texts for English for Hannah and Christopher.  Hannah will use: Primary Language Lessons and Christopher will have:  Lingua Mater

Phonics: Our phonics instruction is based on the  Writing Road to Reading

Literature and Reading: We do not use a reading text, instead we select actual books to read.   I will make a separate post for the children’s reading lists.  Our Shakespeare readings will come from: The Children’s Shakespeare

Writing: We use the Getty & Dubay Handwriting Series.  This fall we will use Book B,   Book C and Book F.  Christopher has Write Source 2000 as a reference for his composition.

American History: From Sea to Shining Sea will be the text.

World History: Christopher will have The Story of Mankind, Josh will be learning from: The Story of the World

Science: The children’s science references will be Christopher: Encyclopedia of Science Hannah: Encyclopedia of Planet Earth Josh: First Encyclopedia of Our World

Latin: Christopher’s Latin test will be:Cambridge Latin Course Unit 1 Josh and Hannah will do less formal work with Prima Latina

German: Christopher will start informal German studies with Berlitz German

Piano: Alfred’s Basic Piano Library and John Thompson’s Modern Course for the Piano

Other subjects do not have a particular text or reference.  For some of them I wasn’t able to find exactly what I wanted and ended up cobbling together my own “text” for others we use reading lists or unit studies which I will describe in a future post.  But the above list is pretty much it for texts.

Homeschooling – Planning for next year – Subjects

June 10, 2009 § 1 Comment

Summer is just beginning and so has the work of planning next year’s studies for the children.  It isn’t really work – though it can be rather time consuming – it is fun.  There is something really exciting about going through all your supplies, perusing the web, reading through the catalogs and deciding on those things that you hope will spark your children’s excitement and wonder.    This is all restrained by the realities of budget and time, but the initial planning phase is such a hopeful time.

The picture book - Robert Blum

The picture book - Robert Blum

This year I am doing a bit more formal lesson planning.  I am breaking the year into three 12 week periods.  Our calendar runs Term 1:  September 7 – November 20 (one week off for Thanksgiving) then November 30 – December 4 then off for Christmas.    Term 2:  January 4 – March 22 one week then off for Easter. Term 3:  April 5 – June 25 then off again for summer.   I am working on creating the master “lesson plans” for the first term for each child.  I created planning pages using MS Publisher – I print them out blank and then use pencil and post-it notes to fill in the plans until they are were I like them.

Christopher will be starting his first year of  “middle school”  studies.  Approximately 6th grade work.  Hannah will be doing early elementary school work, about the third grade level and Josh will be starting with grammar stage- first grade work.   Sarah will begin some formal work,  mostly pre-kindergarten stuff.

Christopher’s subjects will be: Religion, Math (pre-algebra), English, Literature (classic literature, and an introduction to Shakespeare),  Writing (penmanship and composition), American History, World History,  Geography and Cultures, Science (physical science and nature journal)  Latin (beginning formal study),  Art and Music History, Art (drawing and watercolor), Music (piano) and German (informal introduction).

Hannah’s subjects will be: Religion,  Math,  English (grammar),  Reading,  Writing (penmanship and copy work),  American History,  Geography and Cultures,  Science (earth science and nature journal),  Latin (informal),  Art (drawing and watercolor), and  Music (piano)

Josh’s subjects will be: Religion,  Math,  Phonics,  Reading,  Writing (penmanship),  Geography and Cultures,  Science (earth science and nature journal),  Latin (informal),  Art (drawing and watercolor), and  Music (piano)

Sarah will have:  Religion,  pre-K Math, Letter Recognition,  Arts and Crafts,  World Cultures,  Nature Discoveries,  and Music (songs)

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