This isn’t Homeschooling it is just trying to school at home in a crisis.

August 1, 2020 § Leave a comment

The boat sunk

You haven’t been remote working and you haven’t been homeschooling since Covid-19 broke out. What you have been doing is trying to work from home in a crisis and trying to help your kids finish the school year (or start an new one) at home with no time to prepare. What we have been doing the past few months is as close to Remote work and homeschooling as getting washed up on a desert island after the boat had sunk is to going on an island vacation. There was no plan, no structure, no real support and no idea when you would be rescued or how that would happen.

You haven’t failed

Let’s start with the simple truth, no matter how bad last spring was for your kids you haven’t failed. But this situation has been so hard on so many kids. They are missing their friends, activities, milestones – life. And they are stuck at home trying to follow lesson plans and do zoom meetings in a vacuum. And it is so hard.

One of the boogie-men that homeschoolers are often confronted with is “What about socialization?” frequently asked in random grocery store check-out lanes from probably well-meaning strangers, accompanied by a smile that confirms they have played the ultimate “gotcha” card. But now this is actually a real question. Even veteran homeschoolers have had a hard time. We are used to play dates, field trips, enrichment classes and dances. Summer camp and team sports have been cancelled. Socialization is suddenly a real concern.

This might not be over yet. The first school to reopen this year had to worry about infect students after the very first day. This doesn’t bode well for us being able to go back to any semblance of normal anytime soon. Families who have shifted their plans to homeschool in the fall are actually in a better place at this point than families that are waiting for the schools to figure out what is happening. (this goes for businesses too)

5 things you can do to make this fall better

  1. Shift your mindset to homeschool mindset – Remember that you, as the parent, are the one responsible for educating your children. The school is there as a resource to help you. No matter what the school does or doesn’t do you are the one who has the God given responsibility to turn out a competent adult. You know your children better than the school – don’t be afraid to push back.
  2. Plan to get out of the house every week – go on walks or hikes, build a tree-house, take up bird watching, do a neighborhood clean-up .. but get out of the house.
  3. Don’t let the school burn your kid out – Schools are notorious for time boxed learning that is actually massively inefficient. In a classroom so much time is spent transitioning 20 or more children from one lesson or activity to another. There are discussions, reading out loud, handing out papers, logging into apps or finding the correct website all set at the pace of the slowest.

    In some cases teachers have been replacing 8 hours a day of “school time” with 8 hours of busy work. The kids would never have been expected to do all this work if they were in a classroom. One of the most common surprises to new homeschoolers is how little time it actually takes to get through a good amount of school work. Make sure that your children aren’t getting overloaded by classroom teachers who have no experience in remote learning.
  4. Make sure that your kids have friend time – even with social distancing you can find ways to get together with friends. Even the most introverted need social connection sometimes. Arrange a picnic, a bike ride, a couple of friends over.
  5. Keep a schedule Have a time to get up, set times for school work, time for play. Create rituals – baked cookies on Wednesday, make Friday Divine Mercy day, and Sunday afternoon family game time. Don’t let one day just bleed into the next until time becomes one mind numbing mass.

With prayer and love our families will navigate moving forward.

It isn’t that difficult

July 17, 2020 § Leave a comment

Lizzy is doing her part to keep people healthy (even though she hates wearing the mask)

I have no idea why so many people are so against the very simple act of wearing a mask when they are out in public. Right now we are facing a very uncertain health situation, and while you might be certain that this is a “plandemic” or “over-blown” the fact remains that we have a public health situation that is possibly deadly to a portion of the population. Our brothers and sisters. Our fellow citizens. If you skip the politicians and just look at the best science information that we have here is what you know. Covid-19 will likely not kill you if you get it, and you probably won’t get it in the first place. And if you do get it your symptoms could range from almost nothing to organ damage.

I am shocked to see that some of the same people who will not vaccinate their children because of a 1 in a million rate of vaccine related injury rate will blithely yet firmly assert their right to not wear a mask. Who really wants to run the risk of passing an infection to someone else? Why not do everything you can, especially when it is something so easy.

So this is my two cents (despite the coin shortage) based on the fact that I have two children who work in grocery stores. They are deemed essential workers and they go to work. And they have to check out your groceries.

You do not wear a mask to protect you. If you are going to get ill it will most likely be because you touched a surface and then your face. You wear a mask to protect others. You can be contagious and not feel that sick or even know you are. Your mild symptoms might be dismissed in your need to buy cereal or laundry soap. So you go out and if you are not wearing a mask every sneeze, every cough, every wheeze could be “sharing the plague”. And that young man or young woman checking you out at the grocery store could bring home a virus and infect a medically fragile sibling or a grandparent.

There are some very few people that due to allergies, skin or breath issues or past trauma have problems wearing masks. If that is you realize I do not have a problem with that and you have nothing but my sympathy. It is the person walking through Costco bellowing about “sheeple” and their “rights” that I take issue with. Sure you have a right to not wear a mask — or clothing at all for that matter — but please just wear it. It is not a government conspiracy to get control and impliment the new world order and start herding Christians into camps – wearing a mask is a simple kindness you can perform for your fellow man. A corporal act of mercy to protect those who are medically fragile. And act of Christian self-mortification for the protection of others. And it help keep my kids from bringing home a virus that could kill my mother.

So please — it shouldn’t be that difficult.

What can your parish do to prevent spreading COVID-19?

March 12, 2020 § Leave a comment

You might think the COVID-19 concerns are panic and overblown – or you might think that we aren’t doing enough fast enough.  The reality is probably somewhere in between, but I want to take a minute here to plead with our church leaders to think through what coronavirus can mean for your parish.

Some quick facts:

Your parishioners are probably older.  Sure we all want to think we belong to the one fabulously vibrant youthful parish, but the truth is that you have a lot of the 65+ crowd in your pews every Sunday.

You bring people in the community who normally aren’t together into the same space every mass.

Your children are germ machines.

People touch things and each other at Mass, they sneeze, they cough – they spread diseases.

Just think of this scenario: Little Bobby goes to school and contracts coronavirus from a classmate on Friday.  He is asymptomatic, but he is carrying the virus.  He sneezes into his hands on the way to mass because he is 6 and six-year-olds do that sort of thing.  Mom and dad are busy talking about the fact that the big game they have tickets to this weekend was canceled – no one thinks to wash their hands before entering the chapel.  The family enters the church and Bobby places a finger into the holy water and makes the sign of the cross, he touches three pews on the way to his seat, he runs his hands over the back of the pew in front of him.  He shakes Susan’s hand at the sign of peace.  Susan lives in the retirement community across the street.  In three days she will be showing signs of illness, in 14 days most of the people living in her community will have COVID-19 and several of them will die.

This is not unlikely.

If your Bishop has not taken the brave and prudent step to suspend mass what can you reasonably do?

At the very least

  • Remove the holy water fonts
  • Do not have the Sign of Peace
  • Put in hand sanitizer stations
  • Ask parents to keep a watchful eye on their small children and ask them not to touch anything
  • Ask parishioners to stay home if they or a family member are ill
  • Clean surfaces in the parish between masses.
  • remove your missals and hymnals
  • Ask parishioners to spread out and not sit close together (6 ft between families is a good guide)
  • Add more masses and ask parishioners to attend off time masses.
  • suspend offering the Eucharist under both species (no communal cup)
  • cancel all church events (including religious education)

 

If you are in a parish and your priest in not taking measures like this what can you do?

  • Attend a less popular mass and sit well away from other parishioners
  • Wash your hands before and after mass and when you return home
  • Do not attend mass if you or a family member are ill
  • Don’t touch anything you don’t have to (this includes touching or kissing images and statues)
  • Stay close to home (if you attend mass while traveling or travel to attend mass you can spread germs either to the new location or bring them from the other location to your community)
  • Pray that this passes quickly and that the situation is not as bad as experts are currently predicting

 

Some helpful links:

CDC Steps to Prevent Illness

Coronavirus and the Catholic Church – here’s what’s coming

As COVID-19 spreads, Catholic entities worldwide take precautions

Make prayer part of your hand-washing to fight virus

 

 

 

 

 

Friday’s in Lent

February 28, 2020 § Leave a comment

lobster dinner

If this is Friday dinner you are missing the point of fasting.

Yes, I have actually seen someone recommend Lobster bisque for Friday in Lent.   That just isn’t fasting.   I mean I suppose it is technically allowed, but still seems to go against the spirit of what you are supposed to be doing.

 

The Last Anchorite

January 19, 2020 § Leave a comment

 

This is a beautiful and peaceful video exploring the world through a Coptic monk.

Yes, I can get through a Novena

January 14, 2020 § Leave a comment

If you, like me, struggle with getting through a novena (it still counts if you skip one day and double up the next, right?)  you might want to try a wonderful prayer tool called Pray More Novenas.    Currently, I am on day 3 for the St. Peregrine Novena

Happy Easter

April 23, 2019 § Leave a comment

easter

Happy Easter.

Say you’re sorry

March 13, 2019 § Leave a comment

broken pitcher

William-Adolphe Bouguereau Broken Pitcher

Every once in a while I see someone else do something (usually in the realm of parenting) that I have done myself about a 1000 times and I am suddenly struck with how absolutely absurd I have been.

When my children were little and hurt a friend or did something naughty I would insist that they say,  “I’m sorry”.   This was ridiculously wrong of me. My children,  I apologize for putting you and me and the other children through this exercise in soothing my own vanity.  What was I teaching you? Were you honestly sorry or were you just going through the motions – were you lying to comply with what I thought was best?  A compelled apology is not an honest admission of guilt, it is not a hope for reconciliation it is simply an act.  It is a pantomime of good behavior.

An honest inventory of conscience would suggest that at least half of my motivation was to show whatever adult might be watching that I took your behavior very seriously and  was working to fix it.  Another part of my brain was thinking that if you just went through the motions you would in time internalize it and would treat other people with gentle humility and empathy.    I am now convinced that this was probably not the best track.  This has led me to a few days of prayer and contemplation which,  as is God’s good way, has shown me several very instructive examples of what is wrong with compelling an apology.

With the years I have left (which are running out rather quickly) for this type of parenting I am determined to do better.   Instead of insisting that you apologize because I am feeling embarrassed by your behavior and because you have objectively done something wrong,  I will attempt to model the behavior I want you to have. Even if that means apologizing to a friend or teacher on your behalf or bearing judgement from other parents because I am not making you do the right thing right then.    I intend to take the time to talk to you, on your level, to help you understand what is the right thing to do – but not force you into something you are not ready for or genuinely feeling.  I will not assume that somewhere inside you are really super sorry and just need me to force it out of you. I will always expect you to behave properly, punish when needed, admonish and instruct.  It is my job to raise you to be kind, Christian and worthy people.  But I won’t force you to say something that is not true.

After some crazy today I had to step back and really think.  What is the worth of a forced apology?    Nothing.   I can say words that I don’t mean and you can hear words that you know I don’t mean and we can all pretend that this is some ‘understanding’, but it is actually a short-cut that creates barriers to any real reconciliation.   I can’t imagine as an adult how I would feel if a co-worker was forced to apologize to me by our manager or even some shop worker was instructed to say they were sorry to me by their employer.   The apology certainly wouldn’t mean anything,  but I have seen grown people insist that this sort of thing take place.

Have we taught our children this weird “I am owed an apology” mentality?  I am beginning to think we have.  This isn’t taught intentionally of course, but when the sandbox scuffle must end with the perpetrator being force by mom or dad to offer their wee little “I’m sorry” what is the offended child seeing and internalizing.  It seems that a good number have learned that an apology is a punishment and they are owed the satisfaction of receiving it as recompense.   If Sally hits Mary with a toy Mary gets to see her tearful friend being drug up in front of her to utter the mea culpa that is now Mary’s right as the injured party.   Is this what drives the teenage Mary to tell her friend “Say you’re sorry or I am not inviting you to my party” or the adult Mary to insist “I am owed an apology or I am never shopping here again”?  What an oddly entitled, misguided exercise.

When I was a girl of about 9 my grandmother told me that an apology never costs you anything, and can gain you understanding and respect.  So I have always tried to remember that letting someone know you are aware that you might have caused them distress is in fact letting them know that you care enough about them to try to make things right.  This small act of Christian compassion and charity is usually a really pleasant thing.   I don’t know that I have ever been rebuffed when I admit that I have done wrongly in hurting someone in some way.   It either ends in the person I have offended being grateful for my words or my burden being lifted by them assuring me I haven’t really caused them any distress.  It is a lovely, grace filled moment either way.

Now, admittedly there are also plenty of times where I am  oblivious to some distress I may have caused.  So I welcome having my bad behavior pointed it out to me. It affords me a chance to set things right if I possibly can.    If you say “wow that really hurt me when you said ___”  I hope that I will always be gracious enough to see and admit my wrong.   But if you come at me and say, “You were mean you own me an apology”,  pretty much we will be at an impasse.  It is going to be much harder for me to get past the insane entitlement of “I am owed” to work my way around to  what did I do to cause you distress.

If  an apology is being set up as a debasement of the the guilty party there is something very broken in the situation.  Even if  something wrong needs to be set right and the offender should offer an apology if the offended party is waiting to gloat  the apology can not be that holy, spiritual moment.  It is at best forced and very likely resented especially if others are involved to watch or enforce.  An apology is the sign of peace, the understanding that when we injure each other we injure the Body of Christ.  It is a literal healing and to mix that with power struggles or shame is like adding poison to what should be a healing balm.

This understanding of the apology as reconciliation isn’t  something that a young child has the ability to understand.  For them the ritual of ‘say you’re sorry’  is a token.  I say this and mommy isn’t as mad, I say this because I was bad.  I am not saying that we shouldn’t encourage our children to apologize when they have done wrongly,   in fact it is very important that we do so.  But it also doesn’t mean teaching them to say things they don’t feel or believe, especially as they get older.  By modeling the behavior we wish to see.  Perhaps mommy saying  “I am so sorry Sally hit you, Mary, she is going to have a time out now.”  demonstrates the proper behavior with out forcing Sally to lie or giving Mary the idea that the apology that she is owed is a form of restitution that she is entitled to insist on.

What a strange and informative week it has been.  I am thankful to God for having the chance to reflect on this topic. Hopefully I have learned what I need to.

 

 

Bishop Barron at Amazon.

January 22, 2019 § Leave a comment

Wish I could have been there:

Lies fly truth crawls

January 21, 2019 § Leave a comment

covington

Obviously, the best way to diffuse a tense situation is to bang and chant in the face of a child.

And if you are a Trump supporting Catholic School boy apparently you will be doxed, vilified and denounced before the full story even comes out.   When I first saw the Covington Catholic High School vrs Nathan Phillips story something didn’t seem quite right to me.    People I know who are sensible, intelligent people were posting these videos online and talking about how horrible these kids were, how they should be punched in their “smug faces” and worse.  Now, of course, we are finding out there is more to the story.    Reason does a good job breaking this down.  The problem is now you have a teenage boy receiving death threats and a family being harassed and threatened all because someone lied and the media ate it up because it fits their narrative.

Update: If you really want to see what this kid was up against have someone start clapping about 3 inches from your face and then think about being 16 or so in a crowd with a stranger chanting loudly in a language you don’t understand with his drum inches from your face.

 has a wonderful op-ed on this topic.